Pre-conference workshop (Sunday, July 9)

Pre-conference workshop (Sunday, July 9)

Pre-conference workshop (Sunday, July 9)

60,00

On the day before the official opening ceremony of the conference, you can attend a pre-conference workshop, led by renowned experts in their field; below you will find an overview of the workshops available; clicking on the title of the workshop will show you all relevant details. All reading materials will be available online; just click the title of the publication to access the materials. All workshops will be held in Utrecht University’s Academy Hall (Academiegebouw) in Utrecht’s city centre.

Clear
SKU: N/A

Product Description


Giangiacomo Bravo
Linnaeus University

Amineh Ghorbani
Delft University of Technology

Time
10:00-15:00
Location
TBA

Costs
EUR 60

Computer simulations provide a virtual lab for researchers to test specific hypotheses that are at times infeasible to explore with field and lab experiments. For example, for testing policies and institutional design scenarios, it may be too costly or risky to test the implementation on actual human beings. Simulations are tools that allow researchers to explore potential outcomes of such situations. Furthermore, by using computational power, it is possible to test many more scenarios than lab and field experiments.

Out of many different simulation methods and approaches, agent-based modelling(ABM) is a promising method that represents agents, their decision making and their iteractions, allowing system level of behaviour to emerge (e.g. collective action) from individual actions (e.g., appropriation) and interactions (e.g., markets, agreements).

The goal of this workshop is to introduce the basics of computer simulation, and more specifically, agent-based modelling and simulation. Besides showing the potential usages of ABM for studying common-pool resources and collective action in general, the workshop also reflects on the state-of-art modelling practices in the commons area. We will also build a simple Netlogo model during the workshop to provide hands-on-experiment for the participants.


Required materials:

Laptop with already installed Netlogo software

Elicia Ratajczyk
Arizona State University

Time
09:00-17:00
Location
TBA

Costs
EUR 60
The comparative analysis of case studies using systematically coded data and relational databases has led to significant advancements in the study of social-ecological systems (SES) and the commons. This workshop will not only introduce participants to the methodology and provide them with tools and resources for understanding how the use of coding, relational databases and comparative analysis may improve their research projects, but also how their research can contribute to the existing resource of knowledge that has been collected within existing relational databases.

Part 1 – The fundamentals of the methodology
The workshop will first focus on introducing participants to the fundamentals of the methodology, including important aspects of preliminary decision-making, structure, codebook development, coding protocols, processes and tools. We will discuss the challenges which can hamper coding and comparative analysis, as well as opportunities to improve or enhance research projects. We will also introduce a number of new tools being developed by an interdisciplinary group of early career scientists which are designed to help researchers connect with the deep resource of existing frameworks, theories, variables, and databases that relate to the study of social-ecological systems and the Commons. These tools can aid in the understanding of how popular frameworks and theories map to one another and how variables from one coding system or model compare with variables from another coding system or model, thus creating a basis by which important decisions about research design and methodology can be improved.

Part 2 – Coding applied to SES and Commons research
The second half of the workshop will focus on providing examples of how coding and comparative analysis techniques have shaped and continue to shape cutting edge SES and Commons research. We will showcase several prominent coding systems, discussing the processes and variables used, differences and commonalities, and the types of projects to which this methodology is currently being applied. This portion of the workshop will also link back to the tools presented during the first half of the workshop and discuss ways that participants can utilize and adapt these tools to their own projects.


Reading materials:
Ratajczyk, E. et al, 2016. Challenges and opportunities in coding the commons: problems, procedures, and potential solutions in large-N comparative case studies. International Journal of the Commons 10(2): 440-466

Miguel Laborda-Pemán
Utrecht University

Time
10:00-15:00
Location
TBA

Costs
EUR 60

Until recently most analyses on common-pool institutions have exhibited a clear static approach. Taking the performance of complex socio-ecological systems (however measured) as the variable to explain, literature has usually focused on identifying the exogenous factors (rules and institutions among them) susceptible of explaining disparate levels of success. Only in more recent years a more dynamic view has started to become more visible in the literature. Growing concerns around resilience, robustness and complex system adaptiveness has pushed scholars to pay increasing attention to the evolution of these systems over time and, especially, to the process of change in the institutions underlying commoners’ behavior.

The aim of this workshop is to bring this expertise on the long-term evolution of commons closer to other commons’ scholars. Historians’ specific interest with developments unfolding over long-term horizons, the importance of contextual factors, and beliefs, values and power dynamics, are likely to greatly benefit the current trend towards more dynamic analyses of the commons. In order to do that, in this workshop an overview of the main topics covered by historians studying commons over the last fifty years will be presented – with a special attention to current methodological attempts to study the evolution of common-pool institutions in the long run. Specifically, the workshop will be organized around three different blocks: (i) traditional historiography on the commons, (ii) the recent re-assesment of the commons among historians, and (iii) future perspectives for the historical analysis of the commons. Three lectures introducing each of these topics will be delivered to be followed by discussion among participants. In order to guarantee a fruitful discussion, participants in the workshop are strongly encouraged to read the items in the reference list in advance (particularly relevant readings are indicated with *). No specific requirements are needed to register in this workshop – except some general knowledge on current academic debates on the study of commons and similar collective-action institutions.

Reading materials:

Allen, Robert C., 1982. The efficiency and distributional consequences of eighteenth century enclosures. The Economic Journal 92(368): 937-953.
De Moor, Tine, 2009. Avoiding tragedies: a Flemish common and its commoners under the pressure of social and economic change during the eighteenth century. The Economic History Review 62(1): 1-22.
De Moor, Tine, Laborda Pemán, Miguel, Lana Berasain, José-Miguel, Van Weeren, René, and Winchester, Angus, 2016. Ruling the commons. Introducing a new methodology for the analysis of historical commons. International Journal of the Commons 10(2): 529–588.
McCloskey, D., 1972. The enclosure of open fields: Preface to a study of its impact on the efficiency of English agriculture in the eighteenth century. The Journal of Economic History 32(1): 15-35.

For additional literature, download the extended literature list (pdf).

Marco A. Janssen
Arizona State University

Time
10:00-15:00
Location
TBA

Costs
EUR 60

Experimental methods enable researchers to test specific hypotheses of a theory. The study of collective action and the commons has largely benefited by the use of experimental methods, which provided a better understanding of observed phenomena in individual case studies.

This workshop provides an overview of experimental methods, in the lab (student participants) and in the field (farmers, fishers, etc.), as used to study commons dilemmas. We first provide a background on the basic principles of experimental methods, and the basic designs of public good games and common pool resources games. Then we present the key findings of the use of experiments for our understanding of governing common resources. We subsequently discuss some more recent work in which ecological dynamics are included in lab and field experiments. Besides the presentation of results, we will also provide practical guidance how to design, run and analyze experiments in the lab and in the field.

Finally, we discuss how experimental games could be used as an intervention tool, and provide an example on groundwater management in India.

Reading materials:
Janssen, M.A., 2012. A behavioral perspective on the governance of common resources. Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability 12: 1-15.

Gabriela Lichtenstein
CONICET

Rinki Sarkar
Independent researcher

Time
10:00-15:00
Location
TBA

Costs
EUR 60

Biodiversity conservation and poverty alleviation are both important societal goals demanding increasing international attention. The rural poor often depend on biodiversity for a wide range of natural resources and ecosystem services essential for their well-being, and are therefore potentially affected by their degradation. The international policy frameworks that guide action to address poverty alleviation and conservation makes an explicit assumption that conserving biodiversity will help to tackle global poverty. However, conservationists, development practitioners, and policy makers often have differing perspectives and priorities on how — and whether — to link biodiversity conservation with poverty reduction. Attempts to find common ground have often resulted in platitudes that fail to confront real problems faced by conservation and development projects, plans, and policies.


In this workshop we explore whether biodiversity conservation is a route to poverty alleviation, and conversely if poverty alleviation is a route to better biodiversity management, and how insights from the commons can contribute to this debate. Why do different conservation interventions vary in their impact on poverty alleviation? Do conservation interventions always benefit the poor? How do institutional arrangements affect conservation outcomes and poverty impacts of interventions? What lessons can be drawn from the study of the commons that can contribute to this debate?


We will introduce the participants to the fundamentals of the biodiversity-poverty alleviation international debate, and provide examples drawn from community-based research from different ecosystems and regions to stimulate discussion. On the second section of the workshop several techniques will be used to promote participation from the audience. Participants will work in groups and share their experiences and challenges faced in their projects with regards the tension between conservation and poverty alleviation. We hope to engage in a collaborative process of knowledge production and sharing challenges in a multidisciplinary and diverse environment. We welcome students, academics, NGO members, and practitioners.


Reading materials (to be completed):

Billé, R., Lapeire, R., and Purard, R., 2012. Biodiversity conservation and poverty alleviation: a way out of the deadlock? Sapiens 5(2). Also available online via https://sapiens.revues.org/1452.

John Powell
University of Gloucestershire

Time
10:00-15:00
Location
Academiegebouw (Academia Hall)

Costs
EUR 60

‘Managing our Common Resources’ focuses on different aspects of commons, in particular their management, governance and sustainability. The workshop will start with an exploration of the extent of both ‘traditional’ (for example, water, forests, pasture, fisheries) and ‘new’ (such as intellectual property, genetic resources, the internet, knowledge) commons. We will start by looking at the key concepts and theories underpinning commons resource governance and management, and then move on to explore the notions of co-operation, self-interest and rational choice. In terms of scale we will move from the local to the global, taking in a range of examples to illustrate the opportunities and challenges for commons management and governance.

We will also tackle some of the key mis-understandings that have resulted in the denigration of commons resources, particularly in relation to the concept of the ‘tragedy’ of the commons.

Workshop participants will then be challenged to explore the nature of property rights, the role of trust and the characteristics of rules and institutions as foundations for collective action.

The workshop will be strongly participatory with a mix of presentations, discussion, and interactive group exercises. This is an area where we can learn from each other as participants will bring their own valuable knowledge and experiences to the sessions to enrich our understanding of commons management under different social, economic, political and environmental conditions.
Those attending the workshop will improve their understanding of commons management and through exposure to examples of successful strategies participants will understand that taking a ‘commons’ approach can lead to sustainable governance solutions. Participants will gain an increased awareness of the possibilities offered by designing the institutional arrangements needed for good commons governance.

Learning outcomes:
- Understanding that commons are not a universal ‘tragedy’
- Increased awareness of the possibilities, difficulties and benefits of cooperation
- Exposure to real world examples of successful management strategies
- Improved understanding of the nature of property and the roles of institutions


Reading materials:
Not applicable.
Pre-conference workshop (Sunday, July 9)